Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Tim McNeese
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438103409
Format: PDF
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On a muggy summer day in 1892, an unassuming, well-dressed shoemaker from New Orleans named Homer Plessy bought a first-class ticket from the East Louisiana Railroad and boarded a passenger car designated whites only. But Plessy's journey was soon derailed. By day's end, he'd been arrested and convicted. His crime? Being black and boarding the wrong railroad car. Plessy's act of defiance constituted a violation of the state's separate-car law, a statute designed to keep the races separated on Louisiana's public transportation systems. Over the next four years, his case would work its way through the legal system until it landed on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. To Plessy supporters, the case served as a signpost for America's future. Would Jim Crow statutes continue to define black and white relations in the approaching 20th century? Or would blacks be able to taste new freedom? Plessy v. Ferguson sets the scene for this benchmark case with solid background information and lively biographies of those involved. Full-color photographs, detailed footnotes, and a chronology and timeline help put the proceedings in context.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: David Cates
Publisher: ABDO
ISBN: 1614789673
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The US Supreme Court is the head of the judicial branch of the federal government. It is the highest court in the land, with thousands of cases appealed to it every year. One of those history-making cases was Plessy v. Ferguson, which decided the constitutionality of "separate but equal" policies in 1896. Readers will follow this case from beginning to end, including the social and political climates that led up to it and the effects it had after the court made its ruling. Major players and key events are discussed, including Homer Plessy and the Citizens' Committee, and their fight against Louisiana's separate train cars law. Compelling chapters and informative sidebars also introduce Dred Scott v. Stanford, the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln, slavery, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments, Reconstruction, the Freedman's Bureau, Jim Crow laws, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, the NAACP, and Brown v. Board of Education. Plessy v. Ferguson addressed segregation and racism. This landmark Supreme Court case changed the course of US history and shaped the country we live in. Landmark Supreme Court Cases is a series in Essential Library, an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Brook Thomas
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312137434
Format: PDF, ePub
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In 1896, The Supreme Court's Plessy v. Ferguson decision made legal a system of "separate but equal" racial segregation not overruled until 1954. Using the full text of the Court's opinion, along with a selection of responses to the ruling, Brook Thomas allows students to re-create a context of the complicated debates and conditions in which the decision took place.

Plessy V Ferguson

Author: Williamjames Hoffer
Publisher: Landmark Law Cases & American
ISBN: 9780700618477
Format: PDF
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A concise readable summary and guide to Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), one of the Supreme Court's most famous and controversial decisions--one that offered legal cover for the practice of segregation for nearly six decades.

Color Blind Justice

Author: Mark Elliott
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199708347
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Civil War officer, Reconstruction "carpetbagger," best-selling novelist, and relentless champion of equal rights--Albion Tourg?e battled his entire life for racial justice. Now, in this engaging biography, Mark Elliott offers an insightful portrait of a fearless lawyer, jurist, and writer, who fought for equality long after most Americans had abandoned the ideals of Reconstruction. Elliott provides a fascinating account of Tourg?e's life, from his childhood in the Western Reserve region of Ohio (then a hotbed of abolitionism), to his years as a North Carolina judge during Reconstruction, to his memorable role as lead plaintiff's counsel in the landmark Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson. Tourg?e's brief coined the phrase that justice should be "color-blind," and his career was one long campaign to make good on that belief. A redoubtable lawyer and an accomplished jurist, Tourg?e's writings represent a mountain of dissent against the prevailing tide of racial oppression. A poignant and inspiring study in courage and conviction, Color-Blind Justice offers us an unforgettable portrayal of Albion Tourg?e and the principles to which he dedicated his life.

Black Life in Old New Orleans

Author: Keith Weldon Medley
Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company
ISBN: 9781589805644
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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People of African descent have shaped New Orleans from its earliest days into the vibrant city it is today. From the slaves and indentured servants who drained the swamps, erected the buildings, constructed the levees, and dug the canals to the Freedom Riders who fought for racial equality in a segregated South, New Orleans' history and black history in America are intricately connected. Historian Keith Weldon Medley recounts the rich history of African and African-American cultural influence on one of America's most-beloved cities. This in-depth account is one of personal significance for the author, who was raised in New Orleans' Faubourg Marigny and whose family history is tied to the area. Through fifteen self-contained chapters, Medley takes a chronological and focused look at some of New Orleans' most prominent people and places. Rife with detailed histories of Faubourg Tremi1/2, Congo Square, and many other pivotal locations, Medley's subjects include the Mardi Gras Indians, the Zulu Parade, and Louis Armstrong and his upbringing in black Storyville. Tales of many other prominent New Orleanians also fill the pages, such as educator and civic leader Fannie C. Williams, founder of the People's Defense League Ernest Wright, and civil rights attorney A.P. Tureaud.

Plessy v Ferguson

Author: Thomas J. Davis Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313391882
Format: PDF, ePub
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More than the story of one man's case, this book tells the story of entire generations of people marked as "mixed race" in America amid slavery and its aftermath, and being officially denied their multicultural identity and personal rights as a result.

The Human Tradition in the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Susan M. Glisson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742544093
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This engaging collection of biographies explores the greater civil rights movement in America from Reconstruction to the 1970s while emphasizing the importance of grassroots actions and individual agency in the effort to bring about national civil renewal. While focusing on the importance of individuals on the local level working towards civil rights they also explore the influence that this primarily African-American movement had on others including La Raza, the Native American Movement, feminism, and gay rights. By widening the time frame studied, these essays underscore the difficult, often unrewarded and generational nature of social change.

The United States of the United Races

Author: Greg Carter
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477251X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.