Transforming Parks and Protected Areas

Author: Kevin S. Hanna
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134190085
Format: PDF, Docs
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**This title was originally published in 2007. The version published in 2012 is a PB reprint of the original HB** The protection of natural resources and biodiversity through protected areas is increasingly based on ecological principles. Simultaneously the concept of ecosystem-based management has become broadly accepted and implemented over the last two decades. However, this period has also seen unprecedented rapid global social and ecological change, which has weakened many protection efforts. These changes have created an awareness of opportunities for innovative approaches to managing protected areas and of the need to integrate social and economic concerns with ecological elements in protected areas and parks management. A rare collection of articles that fuses academic theory, critique of practice and practical knowledge, Transforming Parks and Protected Areas analyzes and critiques these theories, practices, and philosophies, looking in-detail at the emerging issues in the design and operation of parks and protected areas. Addressing critical dynamics and current practices in parks and protected areas management, the excellent volume goes well beyond simple managerial solutions and descriptions of standard practice. With contributions from leading academics and practitioners, this book will be of value to all those working within ecology, natural resources, conservation and parks management as well as students and academics across the environmental sciences and land use management.

Social Transformation in Rural Canada

Author: John Parkins
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774823828
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The rapidly changing nature of life in Canadian rural communities is more than a simple response to economic conditions. People living in rural places are part of a new social agenda characterized by transformation of livelihoods, landscapes, and social relations, inviting us to reconsider the meanings of community, culture, and citizenship. This volume presents the work of researchers from a variety of fields who explore social transformation in rural settlements across the country. The essays collectively generate a nuanced portrait of how local forms of action, adaptation, identity, and imagination are reshaping aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities of rural Canada.

Transforming the Frontier

Author: Bram Büscher
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822354209
Format: PDF, Mobi
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International peace parks—transnational conservation areas established and managed by two or more countries—have become a popular way of protecting biodiversity while promoting international cooperation and regional development. In Transforming the Frontier, Bram Büscher shows how cross-border conservation neatly reflects the neoliberal political economy in which it developed. Based on extensive research in southern Africa with the Maloti-Drakensberg Transfrontier Conservation and Development Project, Büscher explains how the successful promotion of transfrontier conservation as a "win-win" solution happens not only in spite of troubling contradictions and problems, but indeed because of them. This is what he refers to as the "politics of neoliberal conservation," which receives its strength from effectively combining strategies of consensus, antipolitics, and marketing. Drawing on long-term, multilevel ethnographic research, Büscher argues that transfrontier conservation projects are not as concerned with on-the-ground development as they are purported to be. Instead, they are reframing environmental protection and sustainable development to fit an increasingly contradictory world order.

Evaluating Effectiveness

Author: Marc Hockings
Publisher: IUCN
ISBN: 9782831705460
Format: PDF, ePub
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This publication proposes a framework for assessing management effectiveness, recognising the need for a variety of responses depending on needs and resources. It aims to help all those who wish to assess protected areas, both in suggesting what needs to be done and in providing some guidelines. It includes six practical case studies from Australia, the Congo Basin, Central America, South America and the USA.

Indigenous Peoples National Parks and Protected Areas

Author: Stan Stevens
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816530912
Format: PDF
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""This passionate, well-researched book makes a compelling case for a paradigm shift in conservation practice. It explores new policies and practices, which offer alternatives to exclusionary, uninhabited national parks and wilderness areas and make possible new kinds of protected areas that recognize Indigenous peoples' rights and benefit from their knowledge and conservation contributions"--Provided by publisher"--

Rewilding North America

Author: Dave Foreman
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781559630610
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Annotation Dave Foreman takes on arguably the biggest ecological threat of our time - the global extinction crisis. He not only explains the problem in clear and powerful terms, but also offers a bold, hopeful, scientifically credible, and practically achievable solution.

Rough Waters

Author: Christine J. Walley
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691115597
Format: PDF
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Rough Waters explores one of the most crucial problems of the contemporary era--struggles over access to, and use of, the environment. It combines insights from anthropology, history, and environmental studies, mounting an interdisciplinary challenge to contemporary accounts of "globalization." The book focuses on The Mafia Island Marine Park, a national park in Tanzania that became the center of political conflict during its creation in the mid-1990s. The park, reflecting a new generation of internationally sponsored projects, was designed to encourage environmental conservation as well as development. Rather than excluding residents, as had been common in East Africa's mainland wildlife parks, Mafia Island was intended to represent a new type of national park that would encourage the participation of area residents and incorporate their ideas. While the park had been described in the project's general management plan as "for the people and by the people," residents remained excluded from the most basic decisions made about the park. The book details the day-to-day tensions and alliances that arose among Mafia residents, Tanzanian government officials, and representatives of international organizations, as each group attempted to control and define the park. Walley's analysis argues that a technocentric approach to conservation and development can work to the detriment of both poorer people and the environment. It further suggests that the concept of the global may be inadequate for understanding this and other social dramas in the contemporary world.

Conservation Is Our Government Now

Author: Paige West
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822337492
Format: PDF, ePub
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DIVEthnography and critique of conservationist efforts in Papua New Guinea, focusing on the misunderstandings, mistranslations, and complexities that arise in the discourse between conservation/biologists and local people./div

Science Conservation and National Parks

Author: Steven R. Beissinger
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022642300X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Today, more than 292 million tourists visit U.S. national parks each year, enjoying the great outdoors and taking selfies with buffalos. And nearly 25,000 professionals, many of them scientists, help guide and educate those tourists. This is all thanks to a group assembled by Stephen T. Mather and Horace M. Albright in 1915 at a still-burgeoning University of California Berkeley campus. Together they plotted a future for the country s existing and evolving national parks. The result was legislation establishing the National Park Service, signed by Woodrow Wilson in 1916. The primary purpose of the park system was to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations . This statement of purpose has always harbored both tension and ambiguity as it does not envision a future in which that conservation and enjoyment of park resources might come into conflict, much less offer principles for striking a balance between the two. Nor does it explain what it means to keep park resources unimpaired for the future, which is where the divide between acceptable and unacceptable change to the parks might lie. Nor, finally, does it define or limit the universe of activities that constitute legitimate enjoyment of park resources. Those are questions that cannot be answered in the abstract, or forever. The principles articulated in the Organic Act are unchanging, but the way those principles apply to specific facts is necessarily a function of the times. How the mission of the US National Park System is interpreted has implications that go well beyond the resolution of specific management conflicts. In 2014, in anticipation of the 2016 centennial of the NPS s establishment, a group of incredible scientists and naturalists gathered at UC Berkeley, in partnership with National Geographic Society, and the NPS, to explore the history, present, and future of the NPS. Science for Parks, Parks for Science is a synthesis of that summit, as well as an opportunity for those who weren t among the 1,000 attendees to read and experience the level of scientific exchange and debate, and the policy implications that followed. Taking on that responsibility, this volume becomes not only a catalyst for park conservation in the US, but also an inspiration for park systems and management the world over."