Leader Developmental Readiness Pursuit of Leadership Excellence

Author: Rebecca J. Reichard
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119245796
Format: PDF
Download and Read
This volume takes an in-depth look at leader development readiness and practice, especially in early life stages where it is especially formative and has the potential magnitude of long-term impact. By understanding developmental readiness – what it is, how to assess it, and how to develop it – we can maximize program impact and it will help both individual leader self-development efforts as well as organized, formal programs in attaining the ultimate goal of increasing and accelerating leader development. The Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Student Leadership explores leadership concepts and pedagogical topics of interest to high school and college leadership educators. Issues are grounded in scholarship and feature practical applications and best practices in youth and adult leadership education.

Early Development and Leadership

Author: Susan E. Murphy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136735496
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download and Read
Today we often look to our leaders in business, government, or the social sector, to make effective decisions in a complex world. Whether they are asked what steps to take to improve competitiveness in a global economy or to make tough ethical choices, well-trained leaders are critical to organizational effectiveness. Although we know much about leadership development for individuals after they take their first job, we know relatively little about their earlier experiences that contributed to their interest in leadership or subsequent effectiveness as leaders. This volume brings together researchers who explore leadership at different points before individuals enter the workforce and asks important questions surrounding definitions of leadership behavior, necessary leader skills and age-related leader tasks, factors contributing to development of leader identity, and ways to improve the process of leader development. With contributions from well-known leadership researchers such as Robert Sternberg, Howard Gardner, Bruce Avolio, and Susan Komives, the volume shows research evidence for factors such as early childhood and youth experiences on leadership development, which have implications for the way we understand and train leadership in today’s organizations.

Psychology Applied to Teaching

Author: Jack Snowman
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285734556
Format: PDF
Download and Read
This title has received wide acclaim for its practical and reader-friendly approach to educational psychology, which demonstrates how complex psychological theories apply to the everyday experiences of in-service teachers. Coverage of educational psychology is framed so that aspiring or developing teachers can see themselves as professionals who continuously seek, find, and test better ways to help their students succeed. PSYCHOLOGY APPLIED TO TEACHING, 14th Edition, combines fresh concepts and contemporary research with long-standing theory and applications to create a book that addresses the needs of today’s teachers and students. This edition also features integration of InTASC Standards, new Learning Objectives correlated with chapter headings and summaries, new Guides to Reading and Studying, new first-person accounts (Improving Practice through Inquiry: One Teacher’s Story), and more. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Practical Teaching in Emergency Medicine

Author: Robert L. Rogers
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118469712
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
Emergency medicine attendings who wish to hone their teaching skills can find a number of books on educational strategies written by physicians from other disciplines. However, until the publication of the first edition of this book, they did not have access to a text written by emergency medicine physicians on methods of teaching that are directly applicable to teaching EM. This book was compiled to meet that need. Following the introductory section, which provides important background information, the book’s contents are organized into 4 sections that correspond to the core needs and interests of EM educators: Section 2 focuses on practical and ethical considerations of teaching in the ED; Section 3 provides strategies for teaching specific groups of learners; Section 4 looks at the skills that are characteristic of the best EM educators; and Section 5 looks indepthly at specific teaching techniques and strategies. Now more than ever this book addresses the needs of physician educators from all over the world. New chapters discuss lecturing to an international audience; using simulation as a teaching tool; how to make journal club work for you, and other topics that are of broad interest to medical educators in this field. In general, each chapter has been updated and reviewed to make sure the content was something that emergency physician educators could use in any country . The chapter contributors are widely regarded as leaders in the field of emergency medicine education and faculty development. Authors were given free rein to develop their chapters and write in their own style. They were asked to present their personal views on how to successfully teach the art of emergency medicine, rather than review evidence-based guidelines regarding medical education. As a result, most of the chapters have few references. This first-person approach to a multi-authored textbook yields a compilation that varies in style from chapter to chapter and exposes the reader to a variety of communication techniques.

The Teacher s Role in Implementing Cooperative Learning in the Classroom

Author: Robyn M. Gillies
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387708928
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download and Read
Cooperative learning is widely endorsed as a pedagogical practice that promotes student learning. Recently, the research focus has moved to the role of teachers’ discourse during cooperative learning and its effects on the quality of group discussions and the learning achieved. However, although the benefits of cooperative learning are well documented, implementing this pedagogical practice in classrooms is a challenge that many teachers have difficulties accomplishing. Difficulties may occur because teachers often do not have a clear understanding of the basic tenets of cooperative learning and the research and theoretical perspectives that have informed this practice and how they translate into practical applications that can be used in their classrooms. In effect, what do teachers need to do to affect the benefits widely documented in research? A reluctance to embrace cooperative learning may also be due to the challenge it poses to teachers’ control of the learning process, the demands it places on classroom organisational changes, and the personal commitments teachers need to make to sustain their efforts. Moreover, a lack of understanding of the key role teachers need to play in embedding cooperative learning into the curricula to foster open communication and engagement among teachers and students, promote cooperative investigation and problem-solving, and provide students with emotionally and intellectually stimulating learning environments may be another contributing factor. The Teacher's Role in Implementing Cooperative Learning in the Classroom provides readers with a comprehensive overview of these issues with clear guidelines on how teachers can embed cooperative learning into their classroom curricula to obtain the benefits widely attributed to this pedagogical practice. It does so by using language that is appropriate for both novice and experienced educators. The volume provides: an overview of the major research and theoretical perspectives that underpin the development of cooperative learning pedagogy; outlines how specific small group experiences can promote thinking and learning; discusses the key role teachers play in promoting student discourse; and, demonstrates how interaction style among students and teachers is crucial in facilitating discussion and learning. The collection of chapters includes many practical illustrations, drawn from the contributors’ own research of how teachers can use cooperative learning pedagogy to facilitate thinking and learning among students across different educational settings.

Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products

Author: Institute of Medicine
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780309316248
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download and Read
Tobacco use by adolescents and young adults poses serious concerns. Nearly all adults who have ever smoked daily first tried a cigarette before 26 years of age. Current cigarette use among adults is highest among persons aged 21 to 25 years. The parts of the brain most responsible for cognitive and psychosocial maturity continue to develop and change through young adulthood, and adolescent brains are uniquely vulnerable to the effects of nicotine. At the request of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products considers the likely public health impact of raising the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products. The report reviews the existing literature on tobacco use patterns, developmental biology and psychology, health effects of tobacco use, and the current landscape regarding youth access laws, including minimum age laws and their enforcement. Based on this literature, the report makes conclusions about the likely effect of raising the minimum age to 19, 21, and 25 years on tobacco use initiation. The report also quantifies the accompanying public health outcomes based on findings from two tobacco use simulation models. According to the report, raising the minimum age of legal access to tobacco products, particularly to ages 21 and 25, will lead to substantial reductions in tobacco use, improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, and save lives. Public Health Implications of Raising the Minimum Age of Legal Access to Tobacco Products will be a valuable reference for federal policy makers and state and local health departments and legislators.

Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations

Author: Kathryn A. Agard
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412968860
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations tackles issues and leadership topics for those seeking to understand more about this dynamic sector of society. A major focus of this two-volume reference work is on the specific roles and skills required of the non-profit leader in voluntary organizations. Key features include: contributions from a wide range of authors who reflect the variety, vibrancy and creativity of the sector itself an overview of the history of non-profit organizations in the United States description of a robust and diverse assortment of organizations and opportunities for leadership an exploration of the nature of leadership and its complexity as exemplified in the non-profit sector availability both in print and online - this title will form part of the 2010 Encyclopedia Collection on SAGE Reference Online. The Handbook includes topics such as: personalities of non-profit leaders vision and starting a nonprofit organization nonprofit law, statutes, taxation and regulations strategic management financial management collaboration public relations for promoting a non-profit organization human resource policies and procedures.