LaDonna Harris

Author: LaDonna Harris
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803273603
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is the unforgettable story of a Comanche woman who has become one of the most influential, inspired, and determined Native Americans in politics. LaDonna Harris was born on a Comanche allotment in southern Oklahoma in the 1930s. From her earliest years, she was immersed in a world of resistance, reform, and political action. As the wife of Senator Fred R. Harris, LaDonna was actively involved in political advising, campaigning, and networking. Not content to remain in the background, LaDonna became a well-known political figure in her own right, serving on the National Indian Opportunities Council as President Lyndon B. Johnson?s appointee and working beside such notable political figures as Hubert Humphrey, Robert Kennedy, and Sargent Shriver. In 1980 she became the vice-presidential nominee for the environmentalist Citizen?s Party. Her story provides a witty and valuable American Indian insider?s view of modern national political scenes.

Re creating the Circle

Author: Stephen Sachs
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826350593
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A collaboration between Native activists, professionals, and scholars, Re-Creating the Circle brings a new perspective to the American Indian struggle for self-determination: the returning of Indigenous peoples to sovereignty, self-sufficiency, and harmony so that they may again live well in their own communities, while partnering with their neighbors, the nation, and the world for mutual advancement. Given the complexity in realizing American Indian renewal, this project weaves the perspectives of individual contributors into a holistic analysis providing a broader understanding of political, economic, educational, social, cultural, and psychological initiatives. The authors seek to assist not only in establishing American Indian nations as full partners in American federalism and society, but also in improving the conditions of Indigenous people world wide, while illuminating the relevance of American Indian tradition for the contemporary world facing an abundance of increasing difficulties.

Beloved Women

Author: Sarah Eppler Janda
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In an era when minorities struggled for recognition, LaDonna Harris and Wilma Mankiller furthered the interests of Native Americans and forged a new place for women in politics by astutely playing accepted notions about ethnicity and gender to their own advantage. In Beloved Women, historian Sarah Eppler Janda examines the public identity these two women created for themselves and how, in turn, their respective identities shaped their political fortunes. Moving beyond the conventional role of a 1950s U.S. senator's wife, Harris discovered opportunities to call attention to the inequalities facing Native Americans. A Comanche, Harris founded activist organizations, testified at congressional hearings, and served on scores of federal committees concerning both women and Native Americans. At the same time, by attributing her humanitarian efforts to tribal values, Harris asserted the relevance of Indian beliefs and customs in modern society. During the heyday of the women's rights movement, Mankiller linked feminist ideas to Cherokee tradition. Indian culture, she asserted, esteems women, as proven by the legendary Beloved Woman who fulfills familial expectations yet also assumes political duties. Mankiller adopted this role when she became the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1985, a position she held for a decade. Harris and Mankiller became national leaders, Janda concludes, in large part because their complex persona--Indian and woman--enabled them to challenge social and political norms.

Spirits of our Whaling Ancestors

Author: Charlotte Cote
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295997583
Format: PDF
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Following the removal of the gray whale from the Endangered Species list in 1994, the Makah tribe of northwest Washington State announced that they would revive their whale hunts; their relatives, the Nuu-chah-nulth Nation of British Columbia, shortly followed suit. Neither tribe had exercised their right to whale - in the case of the Makah, a right affirmed in their 1855 treaty with the federal government - since the gray whale had been hunted nearly to extinction by commercial whalers in the 1920s. The Makah whale hunt of 1999 was an event of international significance, connected to the worldwide struggle for aboriginal sovereignty and to the broader discourses of environmental sustainability, treaty rights, human rights, and animal rights. It was met with enthusiastic support and vehement opposition. As a member of the Nuu-chah-nulth Nation, Charlotte Cote offers a valuable perspective on the issues surrounding indigenous whaling, past and present. Whaling served important social, economic, and ritual functions that have been at the core of Makah and Nuu-chahnulth societies throughout their histories. Even as Native societies faced disease epidemics and federal policies that undermined their cultures, they remained connected to their traditions. The revival of whaling has implications for the physical, mental, and spiritual health of these Native communities today, Cote asserts. Whaling, she says, �defines who we are as a people.� Her analysis includes major Native studies and contemporary Native rights issues, and addresses environmentalism, animal rights activism, anti-treaty conservatism, and the public�s expectations about what it means to be �Indian.� These thoughtful critiques are intertwined with the author�s personal reflections, family stories, and information from indigenous, anthropological, and historical sources to provide a bridge between cultures.

Chevato

Author: William Chebahtah
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803210973
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Here is the oral history of the Apache warrior Chevato, who captured eleven-year-old Herman Lehmann from his Texas homestead in May 1870. Lehmann called him ?Bill Chiwat? and referred to him as both his captor and his friend. Chevato provides a Native American point of view on both the Apache and Comanche capture of children and specifics regarding the captivity of Lehmann known only to the Apache participants. Yet the capture of Lehmann was only one episode in Chevato?s life. ø Born in Mexico, Chevato was a Lipan Apache whose parents had been killed in a massacre by Mexican troops. He and his siblings fled across the Rio Grande and were taken in by the Mescalero Apaches of New Mexico. Chevato became a shaman and was responsible for introducing the Lipan form of the peyote ritual to both the Mescalero Apaches and later to the Comanches and the Kiowas. He went on to become one of the founders of the Native American Church in Oklahoma. ø The story of Chevato reveals important details regarding Lipan Apache shamanism and the origin and spread of the type of peyote rituals practiced today in the Native American community. This book also provides a rare glimpse into Lipan and Mescalero Apache life in the late nineteenth century, when the Lipans faced annihilation and the Mescaleros faced the reservation.

Gambling and Survival in Native North America

Author: Paul Pasquaretta
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816522897
Format: PDF
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"The Pequots have found success at their southeastern Connecticut casino in spite of the odds. But in considering their story, Paul Pasquaretta shifts the focus from casinos to the political struggles that have marked the long history of indigenous-colonial relations.

Viet Cong at Wounded Knee

Author: Woody Kipp
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803216419
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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It was at Wounded Knee, huddled under a night sky lit by military flares and the searchlights of armored personnel carriers, that Vietnam vet Woody Kipp realized that he, as an American Indian, had become the enemy, the Viet Cong, to a country that he had defended at the risk of his life. With candor, bitter humor, and biting insight, this book tells the story of the long and tortuous trail that led Kipp from the Blackfeet Reservation of his birth to a terrible moment of reckoning on the plains of South Dakota. Kipp?s is a story of Native values and practices uneasily intersected by cowboy culture, teenage angst, and quintessentially American temptations and excesses. ø As a boy, Kipp was a passionate reader and basketball player, always ready to brawl and already struggling with discrimination and alcoholism in his teens. From his tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine to his troubled return, from his hell-raising as a violent, womanizing, hard-drinking horse breaker to his consciousness-raising experiences as a college student and foot soldier in the American Indian Movement, Kipp?s memoir offers a unique, firsthand view of the enduring power?and the vulnerability?of Blackfeet culture, of the difficulties inherent in cross-cultural understanding, and of the urgent necessity of overcoming these difficulties if the essential heritage of Native America is to survive.

Every Day Is a Good Day

Author: Wilma Mankiller
Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing
ISBN: 1555917763
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A rare and often intimate glimpse at the resilience and perserverance of Native women who face each day positively and see the richnes in their lives.

All Indians Do Not Live in Teepees or Casinos

Author: Catherine C. Robbins
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803239734
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Both a tribute to the unique experiences of individual Native Americans and a celebration of the values that draw American Indians together, this book explores contemporary Native life. Based on personal experience and grounded in journalism, this story begins with the repatriation of ancestral remains, excavated during an archaeological expedition nearly a century earlier, to the Pueblo peoples of New Mexico. This event, along with subsequent repatriations, has accelerated similar momentum across much of Native America. Author Catherine C. Robbins traces this restorative effect in areas such as economic development, urbanization, the arts, science, and health care. Through dozens of interviews, Robbins draws out the voices of Indian people, some well-known and many at the grassroots level, to speak against the background of the narrative's historical context. The result is a rich account of Native American life in contemporary America, revealing not a monolithic "Indian" experience, but rather a mosaic of diverse peoples existing on a continuum that marks both their distinctions and their shared realities.--From publisher description.