Frances Trollope and the Novel of Social Change

Author: Brenda Ayres
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313317552
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
Victorian writer Frances Trollope has been relegated to a mere footnote in literary history as simply the mother of Anthony. Equally unfortunate is that her 34 novels have been out of print since the nineteenth century. She was, nonetheless, the most provocative female writer of the early Victorian period who used the novel to impel social change. This book invites a reassessment of her historical, cultural, and literary merits.

Frances Trollope

Author: Tamara Wagner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317966899
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
Long overshadowed by her more widely read and reprinted son Anthony, Frances Trollope is almost exclusively remembered for her travel writing and especially for the notoriously controversial Domestic Manners of the Americans. Her impressively prolific career as a writer, however, covered and transgressed several genres, and spanned the early 1830s right through until the mid-1850s. A contemporary of Jane Austen, Trollope wrote social-problem novels about industrial England and satirical exposures of evangelical Christianity, as well as writing the first anti-slavery novel. She was a controversial, yet popular and prolific, writer who lived on her works, while using them to vent her outrage at various social and cultural developments of the time. A reassessment of her position in nineteenth-century literary culture brings to attention her own versatility as well as the various ways in which the pressing issues of the time could be represented and, in turn, helped to form Victorian literature. This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Women's Writing.

For Better For Worse

Author: Carolyn Lambert
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351855360
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download and Read
This interdisciplinary volume explores the fictional portrayal of marriage by women novelists between 1800 and 1900. It investigates the ways in which these novelists used the cultural form of the novel to engage with and contribute to the wider debates of the period around the fundamental cultural and social building block of marriage. The collection provides an important contribution to the emerging scholarly interest in nineteenth-century marriage, gender studies, and domesticity, opening up new possibilities for uncovering submerged, marginalized, and alternative stories in Victorian literature. An initial chapter outlines the public discourses around marriage in the nineteenth century, the legal reforms that were achieved as a result of public pressure, and the ways in which these laws and economic concerns impacted on the marital relationship. It beds the collection down in current critical thinking and draws on life writing, journalism, and conduct books to widen our understanding of how women responded to the ideological and cultural construct of marriage. Further chapters examine a range of texts by lesser-known writers as well as canonical authors structured around a timeline of the major legal reforms that impacted on marriage. This structure provides a clear framework for the collection, locating it firmly within contemporary debate and foregrounding female voices. An afterword reflects back on the topic of marriage in the nineteenth- century and considers how the activism of the period influenced and shaped reform post-1900. This volume will make an important contribution to scholarship on Victorian Literature, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, and the Nineteenth Century.

Women and the Shaping of the Nation s Young

Author: Mary Hilton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351872141
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download and Read
Researchers have neglected the cultural history of education and as a result women's educational works have been disparaged as narrowly didactic and redundant to the history of ideas. Mary Hilton's book serves as a corrective to these biases by culturally contextualising the popular educational writings of leading women moralists and activists including Sarah Fielding, Hester Mulso Chapone, Catherine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hannah More, Sarah Trimmer, Catharine Cappe, Priscilla Wakefield, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Marcet, Elizabeth Hamilton, Mary Carpenter, and Bertha von Marenholtz Bulow. Over a hundred-year period, from the rise of print culture in the mid-eighteenth century to the advent of the kindergarten movement in Britain in the mid-nineteenth, a variety of women intellectuals, from strikingly different ideological and theological milieux, supported, embellished, critiqued, and challenged contemporary public doctrines by positioning themselves as educators of the nation's young citizens. Of particular interest are their varying constructions of childhood expressed in a wide variety of published texts, including tales, treatises, explanatory handbooks, and collections of letters. By explicitly and consistently connecting the worlds of the schoolroom, the family, and the local parish to wider social, religious, scientific, and political issues, these women's educational texts were far more influential in the public realm than has been previously represented. Written deliberately to change the public mind, these texts spurred their many readers to action and reform.

In Contempt

Author: Kristin Kalsem
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780814252390
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download and Read
In Contempt: Nineteenth-Century Women, Law, and Literature, by Kristin Kalsem, explores the legal advocacy performed by nineteenth-century women writers in publications of nonfiction and fiction, as well as in real-life courtrooms and in the legal forum provided by the novel form. The nineteenth century was a period of unprecedented reform in laws affecting women's property, child support and custody, lunacy, divorce, birth control, domestic violence, and women in the legal profession. Women's contributions to these changes in the law, however, have been largely ignored because their work, stories, and perspectives are not recorded in authoritative legal texts; rather, evidence of their arguments and views are recorded in writings of a different kind. This book examines lesser-known works of nonfiction and fiction by legal reformers such as Annie Besant and Georgina Weldon and novelists such as Frances Trollope, Jane Hume Clapperton, George Paston, and Florence Dixie. In Contempt brings to light new connections between Victorian law and literature, not only with its analysis of many "lost" novels but also with its new legal readings of old ones such as Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights (1847), George Eliot's Adam Bede (1859), Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), Rider Haggard's She (1887), and Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure (1895). This study reexamines the cultural and political roles of the novel in light of "new evidence" that many nineteenth-century novels were "lawless"-showing contempt for, rather than policing, the law"