Enacting a Pedagogy of Teacher Education

Author: Tom Russell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134112459
Format: PDF
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Building on John Loughran’s latest work Developing a Pedagogy of Teacher Education, this book focuses on how individuals enact pedagogy in the context of teacher education. With teacher educators actually teaching while showing student-teachers how to teach, the quality of teacher education improves. Bringing together contributions from internationally known teacher educators, a school administrator who supports teachers’ professional learning, someone studying to become a teacher educator and someone studying to become a teacher, the book examines enacting educational and pedagogical values in personal practice and developing the interpersonal relationships that are so essential to quality teaching and learning. Each chapter illustrates an individual working to better understand the processes of teaching and learning and then modifying personal practices to enact a productive pedagogy of teacher education. This collection extends the rich literature emerging from the field while also focusing explicit attention on the challenges of enacting a pedagogy of teacher education.

The Interdependence of Teaching and Learning

Author: Bryant Griffith
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1623961432
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The varied chapters of this book seek to capture the complexities of teaching and learning in today's schools, and they share an interest in exploring the influences of knowledge construction in the moment and over time. Teaching and learning are human processes, interrelated and dynamic. We assembled this collection to unpack what it means to teach and to learn, teasing out some of the implications and challenges of such complicated educational processes that are often misconstrued as causal or linear. As educators currently residing in the United States, we find this a particularly pressing agenda, given the current focus on common core standards and reducing teaching and learning to conceptual and pedagogical stepbystep procedures. Our primary concern in putting together this book was to provide a conceptual and political foundation from which to construct and defend understandings and practices of teaching and learning that embody the complexity of educational endeavors and relationships. The isolation of teaching from learning, and the othering of both teachers and students, one from the other, suggests that knowledge is synonymous with information. This book challenges such assumptions. The project underlying this text can be seen as a means of rethinking how teachers' and students’ perspectives of practice and curriculum influence what learning opportunities are provided to students. Chapters written by established and new thinkers in the field of education demonstrate the ways in which teachers reformulate relationships between teaching and learning in school settings. Our second objective is to examine local constructions of knowledge over time and how those constructions are consequential for teacher and student learning. By examining patterns of practice and processes of knowledge construction in elementary, secondary, and undergraduate classrooms, the authors of these chapters lay a foundation for examining commonalities and differences in the construction of knowledge and practices across educational levels, disciplines, and inschool and outofschool settings.

Developing a Pedagogy of Teacher Education

Author: John Loughran
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134210604
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A pedagogy of teacher education must go well beyond the simple delivery of information about teaching. This book describes and explores the complex nature of teaching and of learning about teaching, illustrating how important teacher educators' professional knowledge is and how that knowledge must influence teacher training practices. The book is divided into two sections. The first considers the crucial distinction between teaching student-teachers and teaching them about teaching, allowing practice to push beyond the technical-rational, or tips-and-tricks approach, to teaching about teaching in a way that brings in the appropriate attitudes, knowledge and skills of teaching itself. Section two highlights the dual nature of student teachers’ learning, arguing that they need to concentrate not only on learning what is being taught but also on the way in which that teaching is conducted.

Teacher Education

Author: Anthony Selkirk
Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book evaluates teacher professional development programs. These programs are evaluated in terms of participants' classroom teaching behaviour, as assessed by their school students' perceptions of their classroom learning environments. Teacher candidates' perceptions of teachers was examined as well. Additionally, this book explores the preparation, roles, and responsibilities of teacher educators. Several studies demonstrated a high prevalence of voice disorders in teachers, together with the personal, professional, and economical consequences of the problem. Prevention programs to reduce the risk for vocal disorders are evaluated. This book discusses a program that combines clinical placement in urban schools with academic course work. Three elements of the program are examined to demonstrate their influence on the learning of candidates. In addition, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of in-service teachers is an important issue for current teacher education in Taiwan. This book describes the related literature to this issue, followed by addressing the models and merits of peer coaching. Attention is given to the problem of HPS (knowledge of history and philosophy of science)in physics teachers education, by designing and discussing a model of intervention aimed at deepening and widening the teachers' disciplinary knowledge and developing an adequate knowledge of Nature of Science (NOS). Teachers who adopt stereotypical images of scientists and their activity are likely to induce negative attitudes towards science and scientists to students. This trend was examined by determining the extent to which Greek teachers adopt a stereotypical model of the scientist and the types of activities they consider to be scientific. In this book, science anxiety, self-efficacy, and self-concept of undergraduate biology students is addressed. Gender differences in these patterns of motivation variables were looked at as well. A course structure framework likely to serve as a tool for the development of training programs and future research studies in the area of prison teacher education is also proposed. Furthermore, prospective "STEM" teachers' motivations are looked at, for undertaking a teaching career and their perceptions of the teaching profession. The ways in which a learning-oriented teaching assessment framework is used to provide the basis for developing teachers into self-regulated learners is examined. Furthermore, the Domain-Specific Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale is addressed, which assesses six domains of teacher self-efficacy. Finally, the role that personal epistemologies play in teacher education, particularly with respect to the potential problems and roadblocks they may present, are evaluated.

Teacher Education Yearbook

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781578867165
Format: PDF
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Imagining a Renaissance Teacher in Education encompasses a wide swath of topics ranging from the need to discuss the psychic rewards ofteaching and adding care to the vision of education to the revamping of particular courses and apprising student teachers of their legal rights before placing them in schools. With chapters written by internationally acclaimed teacher educators and with the voices of teachers, children, and principals are threaded throughtout, this book offers principles of teacher education practice that have been gleaned over time from an international meta-analysis.

Imagining a Renaissance in Teacher Education

Author: Cheryl J. Craig
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781578867172
Format: PDF, Docs
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Imagining a Renaissance Teacher in Education encompasses a wide swath of topics ranging from the need to discuss the psychic rewards ofteaching and adding care to the vision of education to the revamping of particular courses and apprising student teachers of their legal rights before placing them in schools. With chapters written by internationally acclaimed teacher educators and with the voices of teachers, children, and principals are threaded throughtout, this book offers principles of teacher education practice that have been gleaned over time from an international meta-analysis.

Inside Teacher Education Challenging Prior Views of Teaching and Learning

Author: S.M. Bullock
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9460914039
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Learning to teach is complex. Teacher candidates begin a preservice program with powerful tacit assumptions about how teachers teach based on lengthy apprenticeships of observation over many years as students. Virtually all teacher education programs provide a mixture of coursework and classroom experience. Much has been written about the theory-into-practice approach in teacher education, an approach that assumes teacher candidates who have been provided with instructions about how to teach will be able to recall and apply them in a school setting. In reality, teacher candidates report considerable difficulty enacting theory in practice, to the point that many question the value of coursework. This book takes an in-depth look at five future teachers in one teacher education program, analyzing and interpreting how they and their teacher educators learn from experience during both coursework and practicum experiences. Many assumptions about the complex challenges of teaching teachers are called into question. Is the role of a teacher educator to synthesize research-based best practices for candidates to take to their field placements? Does the preservice practicum experience challenge or reinforce a lifetime of socialized experiences in schools? Must methods courses always be seen by most teacher candidates as little more than sites for collecting resources? Where and how do candidates construct professional knowledge of teaching? The data illustrate clearly that methods courses can be sites for powerful learning that challenges tacit assumptions about how and why we teach.

The Moral Dimensions of Teaching

Author: Cary A. Buzzelli
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780815339397
Format: PDF
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Cary Buzzelli and Bill Johnson reinvigorate the enduring question: What is the place of morality in the classroom? Departing from notions of a morality that can only be abstract and absolute, these authors ground their investigation in analyses of actual teacher-student interactions. This approach illuminates the ways in which language, power and culture impact "the moral" in teaching. Buzzelli and Johnson's study addresses a wide range of moral issues in various classroom contexts. Its practical and diverse examples make it a valuable resource for teachers and teacher development programs.

Making a Difference in Teacher Education Through Self Study

Author: Clare Kosnik
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402035289
Format: PDF, Kindle
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* examples of research conducted on 15 different teacher education programs * the impact the research had on the development of the program is included * the text systematically describes 15 teacher education programs * engaging stories of teacher educators working to renew their programs * The studies include a description of the research methodology used