Eats Shoots Leaves

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101218297
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

Eats Shoots and Leaves

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 0007431597
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Anxious about the apostrophe? Confused by the comma? Stumped by the semicolon? Join Lynne Truss on a hilarious tour through the rules of punctuation that is sure to sort the dashes from the hyphens.

Eats Shoots Leaves

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Profile Books Limited
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A witty, entertaining, impassioned guide to perfect punctuation, for everyone who cares about precise writing. Not a primer but a 'zero tolerance' manual for direct action.

Eats Shoots Leaves

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0399244913
Format: PDF
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See how using (or not using) a comma can change the meaning of a sentence.

The Fight for English

Author: David Crystal
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019920764X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Combining a chronological survey of key influences in the area of usage with discussion of such themes as punctuation, spelling, and pronunciation, tells the story of the battles surrounding English usage.

The Girl s Like Spaghetti

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781861971685
Format: PDF, Docs
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A giant kids' playground certainly sounds like fun, but you might want to watch out in the giant kid's playground; he has a tendency to step on people. A sign stating, "we're here to help", would definitely disappoint the customers if the apostrophe were removed. Lynne Truss and Bonnie Timmons once again illustrate the hilarious confusion that punctuation can cause. Having dealt with the comma in Eats, Shoots & Leaves for Children, here they take on the apostrophe using lively, subversive pictures from one of America's leading illustrators and show how much chaos can ensue from one tiny squiggle.

Cat Out of Hell

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Melville House
ISBN: 1612194435
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Acclaimed New York Times bestselling author Lynne Truss (Eats, Shoots & Leaves) is back with a mesmerizing and hilarious tale of cats and murder For people who both love and hate cats comes the tale of Alec Charlesworth, a librarian who finds himself suddenly alone: he’s lost his job, his beloved wife has just died. Overcome by grief, he searches for clues about her disappearance in a file of interviews between a man called "Wiggy" and a cat, Roger. Who speaks to him. It takes a while for Alec to realize he’s not gone mad from grief, that the cat is actually speaking to Wiggy . . . and that much of what we fear about cats is true. They do think they’re smarter than humans, for one thing. And, well, it seems they are! What’s more, they do have nine lives. Or at least this one does – Roger’s older than Methuselah, and his unblinking stare comes from the fact that he’s seen it all. And he’s got a tale to tell, a tale of shocking local history and dark forces that may link not only the death of Alec’s wife, but also several other local deaths. But will the cat help Alec, or is he one of the dark forces? In the deft and comedic hands of mega-bestseller Lynne Truss, the story is as entertaining as it is addictive” (The Sunday Telegraph) – an increasingly suspenseful and often hysterically funny adventure that will please cat lovers and haters alike. And afterwards, as one critic noted, “You may never look at a cat in quite the same way again” (The Daily Mail).

Talk to the Hand

Author: Lynne Truss
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781592401710
Format: PDF, Docs
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An upbeat evaluation of the way discourteous behavior has become commonplace and even applauded in today's society is a humorous call to arms that challenges ill manners and the practices that support them. By the author of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. 500,000 first printing.

Between You Me Confessions of a Comma Queen

Author: Mary Norris
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393246604
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“Hilarious. . . . This book charmed my socks off.” —Patricia O’Conner, New York Times Book Review Mary Norris has spent more than three decades in The New Yorker's copy department, maintaining its celebrated high standards. Now she brings her vast experience, good cheer, and finely sharpened pencils to help the rest of us in a boisterous language book as full of life as it is of practical advice. Between You & Me features Norris's laugh-out-loud descriptions of some of the most common and vexing problems in spelling, punctuation, and usage—comma faults, danglers, "who" vs. "whom," "that" vs. "which," compound words, gender-neutral language—and her clear explanations of how to handle them. Down-to-earth and always open-minded, she draws on examples from Charles Dickens, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, and the Lord's Prayer, as well as from The Honeymooners, The Simpsons, David Foster Wallace, and Gillian Flynn. She takes us to see a copy of Noah Webster's groundbreaking Blue-Back Speller, on a quest to find out who put the hyphen in Moby-Dick, on a pilgrimage to the world's only pencil-sharpener museum, and inside the hallowed halls of The New Yorker and her work with such celebrated writers as Pauline Kael, Philip Roth, and George Saunders. Readers—and writers—will find in Norris neither a scold nor a softie but a wise and witty new friend in love with language and alive to the glories of its use in America, even in the age of autocorrect and spell-check. As Norris writes, "The dictionary is a wonderful thing, but you can't let it push you around."