Contested Masculinities

Author: Nalin Jayasena
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135922691
Format: PDF, ePub
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Exploring how English masculinity - that was so contingent on the relative health of the British imperial project - negotiated the decline and ultimate dissolution of the empire by the middle of the twentieth century, this book argues that by defining itself in relation to indigenous masculinity, English masculinity began to share a common idiom with its colonial other. The rhetoric of indigenous masculinity, therefore, both mimicked and departed from its metropolitan counterpart. The study combines an interdisciplinary approach with a focus that is not limited to a single colonial society but ranges from colonial Bengal, Burma, Borneo and finally to colonial Australia.

Contested Spaces Common Ground

Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004325808
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Space is contested in contemporary multireligious societies. This volume looks at space as a critical theory and epistemological tool within cultural studies that fosters the analysis of power structures and the deconstruction of representations of identities within our societies that are shaped by power.

Unsettled Narratives

Author: David Farrier
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 041597951X
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In the nineteenth-century Pacific, the production of a text of encounter occurred in tandem with the production of a settled space; asserting settler presence through the control of the space and the context of the encounter. Indigenous resistance therefore took place through modes of representation that ‘unsettled’ the text. This book considers the work of four Western visitors to the Pacific—Robert Louis Stevenson, William Ellis, Herman Melville, and Jack London—and the consequences for the written text and the experience of cross-cultural encounter when encounter is reduced to writing. The study proposes a strong connection between settling and writing as assertions of presence, and, by engaging a metaphor of building dwellings and building texts, the study examines how each writer manipulates the process of text creation to assert a dominant presence over and against the indigenous presence, which is represented as threatening, and extra-textual.

The Sea Voyage Narrative

Author: Robert Foulke
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415938945
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From The Odyssey to Moby Dick to The Old Man and the Sea, the long tradition of sea voyage narratives is comprehensively explained here supported by discussions of key texts.

Women and the Journey

Author: Bonnie Frederick
Publisher: Washington State University
ISBN:
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These essays by some of the country's leading women scholars approach the theme of women and travel from a variety of perspectives, including literature, history, foreign languages, fine arts, and women's studies.

Tuff City

Author: Nicholas T. Dines
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857452797
Format: PDF
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During the 1990s, Naples' left-wing administration sought to tackle the city's infamous reputation of being poor, crime-ridden, chaotic and dirty by reclaiming the city's cultural and architectural heritage. This book examines the conflicts surrounding the reimaging and reordering of the city's historic centre through detailed case studies of two piazzas and a centro sociale, focusing on a series of issues that include heritage, decorum, security, pedestrianization, tourism, immigration and new forms of urban protest. This monograph is the first in-depth study of the complex transformations of one of Europe's most fascinating and misunderstood cities. It represents a new critical approach to the questions of public space, citizenship and urban regeneration as well as a broader methodological critique of how we write about contemporary cities.

Old Southampton

Author: Daniel W. Crofts
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813913858
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Crofts (history, Trenton State College) links local and national history. He explains how partisan loyalties developed, white democracy flourished in the late antebellum years, secession sharply divided neighborhoods with few slaves from those with large plantations, and how, following emancipation,

Racial Frontiers

Author: Arnoldo De Le N
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826322722
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Once neglected, racial minorities are now the focus of intense interest among historians of the American West, who have come to recognize the roles of African American, Chinese, and Mexican people in shaping the frontier.Racial Frontiersis both a highly original work, particularly in its emphasis on racial minority women, and a masterful synthesis of the literature in this young field.De León depicts a U.S. West populated by settlers anticipating opportunities for upward mobility, jockeying for position as they adapted to new surroundings, and adjusting to new political and economic systems. Minority groups discarded unworkable political traditions that had followed them from their homelands and sought to participate in a democracy that they trusted would see to their well-being. Many embraced capitalism in preference to the economic systems they had left behind but refused to give up their cultural traditions. The result was a U.S. West of many colors. Known as a skilled writer, De León tells countless stories of the lives of men and women to guide the readers through his narrative. Personal histories and revealing quotations illustrate the struggles and victories of the newcomers, enriching our understanding of the settlement of the trans-Mississippi West since the middle of the nineteenth century.