Different Dispatches

Author: David T. Humphries
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415976758
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Spell Cast by Remains

Author: Patricia Ross
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135505039
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

A History of American Literary Journalism

Author: John C. Hartsock
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558492523
Format: PDF
Download and Read
During the 1960s, such works as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem were cited as examples of the "new journalism." True stories that read like novels, they combined the journalist's task of factual reporting with the art of fictional narration. Yet as John C. Hartsock shows in this revealing study, the roots of this distinctive form of writing--whether called new journalism, literary journalism, or creative nonfiction--can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth century. In the decades following the American Civil War, Stephen Crane, Lafcadio Hearn, and other journalists challenged the notion, then just emerging, that the reporter's job was to offer a concise statement of the "objective truth." Drawing on the techniques of the realistic novel, these writers developed a new narrative style of reporting aimed at lessening the distance between observer and observed, subject and object. By the 1890s, Hartsock argues, literary journalism had achieved critical recognition as a new form of writing, different not only from "objective" reporting but also from the sensationalistic "yellow press" and at times the socially engaged "muckrakers." In the twentieth century, the form has continued to evolve and maintain its vitality, despite being marginalized by the academic establishment. A former journalist who covered Capitol Hill for UPI and reported on the collapse of the Soviet Union for the San Francisco Examiner, Hartsock brings a fresh and informed perspective to the issues he examines. The result is a concise introduction to the genesis and development of a significant literary genre.

A Glossary of Literary Terms

Author: M.H. Abrams
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285974514
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
First published over fifty years ago, A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS remains an essential text for all serious students of literature. Now fully updated to reflect the latest scholarship on recent and rapidly evolving critical theories, the eleventh edition contains a complete glossary of essential literary terms presented as a series of engaging, beautifully crafted essays that explore the terms, place them in context, and suggest related entries and additional reading. This indispensable, authoritative, and highly affordable reference covers terms useful in discussing literature and literary history, theory, and criticism. Perfect as a core text for introductory literary theory or as a supplement to any literature course, this classic work is an invaluable reference that students can continue to use throughout their academic and professional careers. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Edge of Irony

Author: Marjorie Perloff
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022605442X
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
Among the brilliant writers and thinkers who emerged from the multicultural and polyglot world of the Austro-Hungarian Empire were Sigmund Freud, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Franz Kafka, and Paul Celan. For them, the trauma of the First World War included the sudden dissolution of the geographical entity into which they were born. Austria, the small, fragile republic that emerged from the Empire in 1918, became in Karl Kraus s words the research laboratory for world destruction. In this major reconsideration of European modernism, Marjorie Perloff identifies and explores the aesthetic world that emerged from the rubble of WWI Vienna and other former Hapsburg territoriesan Austro-Modernist ethos that strangely anticipates the darkness and cynicism of our own disillusioned twenty-first-century culture. Perloff introduces works in a variety of genresdrama (Kraus s Last Days of Mankind ), the novel (Roth s The Radetzky March ), the essay (central to Robert Musil s The Man without Qualities ), the memoir (Elias Canetti s The Tongue Set Free ), the lyric poem (Celan s love poetry), and the philosophical notebook (Wittgenstein)so as to give even non-specialists a sense of the complex and troubled literary scene created in the shadow of empire and war. These writers created a deeply skeptical and resolutely individualistic modernismone much less ideologically charged, for example, than its counterpart in Germany. Austro-Modernism was not avant-garde in the usual senses, Perloff shows. But its savage and grotesquely comic irony, its conviction, most memorably expressed by Wittgenstein, that argumentation was best conveyed through aphorism, its fondness for paradox and contradiction as modes of understanding, and its early embrace of an aesthetics of documentation and appropriationthese may well be the most lasting legacies of any modernist movement. Austro-Modernism emerges here as a vital alternative, not only to the French and Anglo-American modernisms that have largely defined the period, but also to Weimar and the Frankfurt School, so central to Anglo-American cultural studies."

Poetry on Off the Page

Author: Marjorie Perloff
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 9780810115613
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
The fourteen essays that make up this collection have as their common theme a reconsideration of the role historical and cultural change has played in the evolution of twentieth-century poetry and poetics. Committed to the notion that, in John Ashbery's words, "You can't say it that way anymore," Poetry On & Off the Page describes the formations and transformations of literary and artistic discourses, and traces these discourses as they have evolved in their dialogue with history, culture, and society. The volume is testimony to the important role that contemporary artistic practice will continue to play as we move into the twenty-first century.

Dispatches

Author: Michael Herr
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307814165
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download and Read
"The best book to have been written about the Vietnam War" (The New York Times Book Review); an instant classic straight from the front lines. From its terrifying opening pages to its final eloquent words, Dispatches makes us see, in unforgettable and unflinching detail, the chaos and fervor of the war and the surreal insanity of life in that singular combat zone. Michael Herr’s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time. Dispatches is among the most blistering and compassionate accounts of war in our literature.

Poetry and the Public

Author: Joseph Harrington
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819565385
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
An informative account of the social meaning of poetry in the 20th century US.

Idioms of Self interest

Author: Jill Phillips Ingram
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 0415978424
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
Idioms of Self-Interest uncovers an emerging social integration of economic self-interest in early modern England by examining literary representations of credit relationships in which individuals are both held to standards of communal trust and rewarded for risk-taking enterprise. Drawing on women's wills, merchants' tracts, property law, mock testaments, mercantilist pamphlets and theatrical account books, and utilizing the latest work in economic theory and history, the book examines the history of economic thought as the history of discourse. In chapters that focus on The Merchant of Venice, Eastward Ho!, and Whitney's Wyll and Testament, it finds linguistic and generic stress placed on an ethics of credit that allows for self-interest. Authors also register this stress as the failure of economic systems that deny self-interest, as in the overwrought paternalistic systems depicted in Shakespeare's Timon of Athens and Francis Bacon's New Atlantis. The book demonstrates that Renaissance interpretive formations concerning economic behaviour were more flexible and innovative than appears at first glance, and it argues that the notion of self-interest is a coherent locus of interpretation in the early seventeenth century.