Beyond El Barrio

Author: Gina M. Pérez
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081479128X
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this thirtieth annual volume in the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy's NOMOS series, entitled Religion, Morality and the Law , twelve distinguished contributers consider a diverse selection of topics. Included are essays on "Natural Law and Creation Stories," "Divine Sanction and Legal Authority," and "Liberalism, Neutralism, and Rights." These works ask whether morality itself can survive without the support of religion. Political scientists, philosophers, and legal scholars will find this collection extremely valuable. Each author is a leading force within their specialized fields.

Understanding Latino History Excavating the Past Examining the Present

Author: Pablo R. Mitchell
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440841691
Format: PDF, Docs
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This Latino history textbook is an outstanding reference source that covers many different Latinos groups within a single comprehensive narrative. • Provides information that is accessible to a general student audience, supplying a comprehensive narrative history that covers various Latino groups along with profiles of notable Latinos from every era • Covers all Latino groups, placing the history of Mexican Americans alongside the cultures and experiences of Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Central and South Americans • Includes primary sources with guiding questions that will help students develop interpretive, critical thinking skills • Ideally suited to serve as a reference source and as a classroom survey text for students studying Latino history

Playing America s Game

Author: Adrian Burgos
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520940776
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Although largely ignored by historians of both baseball in general and the Negro leagues in particular, Latinos have been a significant presence in organized baseball from the beginning. In this benchmark study on Latinos and professional baseball from the 1880s to the present, Adrian Burgos tells a compelling story of the men who negotiated the color line at every turn—passing as "Spanish" in the major leagues or seeking respect and acceptance in the Negro leagues. Burgos draws on archival materials from the U.S., Cuba, and Puerto Rico, as well as Spanish- and English-language publications and interviews with Negro league and major league players. He demonstrates how the manipulation of racial distinctions that allowed management to recruit and sign Latino players provided a template for Brooklyn Dodgers’ general manager Branch Rickey when he initiated the dismantling of the color line by signing Jackie Robinson in 1947. Burgos's extensive examination of Latino participation before and after Robinson's debut documents the ways in which inclusion did not signify equality and shows how notions of racialized difference have persisted for darker-skinned Latinos like Orestes ("Minnie") Miñoso, Roberto Clemente, and Sammy Sosa.

The Heart of the Mission

Author: Cary Cordova
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812294149
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In The Heart of the Mission, Cary Cordova combines urban, political, and art history to examine how the Mission District, a longtime bohemian enclave in San Francisco, has served as an important place for an influential and largely ignored Latino arts movement from the 1960s to the present. Well before the anointment of the "Mission School" by art-world arbiters at the dawn of the twenty-first century, Latino artists, writers, poets, playwrights, performers, and filmmakers made the Mission their home and their muse. The Mission, home to Chileans, Cubans, Guatemalans, Mexican Americans, Nicaraguans, Puerto Ricans, and Salvadorans never represented a single Latino identity. In tracing the experiences of a diverse group of Latino artists from the 1940s to the turn of the century, Cordova connects wide-ranging aesthetics to a variety of social movements and activist interventions. The book begins with the history of the Latin Quarter in the 1940s and the subsequent cultivation of the Beat counterculture in the 1950s, demonstrating how these decades laid the groundwork for the artistic and political renaissance that followed. Using oral histories, visual culture, and archival research, she analyzes the Latin jazz scene of the 1940s, Latino involvement in the avant-garde of the 1950s, the Chicano movement and Third World movements of the 1960s, the community mural movement of the 1970s, the transnational liberation movements in Nicaragua and El Salvador, and the AIDS activism of the 1980s. Through these different historical frames, Cordova links the creation of Latino art with a flowering of Latino politics.

The Near Northwest Side Story

Author: Gina Perez
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520233689
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The Near Northwest Side Story is a fascinating account of transnational migration as survival strategy, one bound up in kin, region, and gender. Gina M. Perez offers an intimate and unvarnished portrait of Puerto Rican life in Chicago and San Sebastian, Puerto Rico - two places connected by a long history of circulating people, ideas, goods, and information.

Forging Diaspora

Author: Frank Andre Guridy
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895979
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Cuba's geographic proximity to the United States and its centrality to U.S. imperial designs following the War of 1898 led to the creation of a unique relationship between Afro-descended populations in the two countries. In Forging Diaspora, Frank Andre Guridy shows that the cross-national relationships nurtured by Afro-Cubans and black Americans helped to shape the political strategies of both groups as they attempted to overcome a shared history of oppression and enslavement. Drawing on archival sources in both countries, Guridy traces four encounters between Afro-Cubans and African Americans. These hidden histories of cultural interaction--of Cuban students attending Booker T. Washington's Tuskegee Institute, the rise of Garveyism, the Havana-Harlem cultural connection during the Harlem Renaissance and Afro-Cubanism movement, and the creation of black travel networks during the Good Neighbor and early Cold War eras--illustrate the significance of cross-national linkages to the ways both Afro-descended populations negotiated the entangled processes of U.S. imperialism and racial discrimination. As a result of these relationships, argues Guridy, Afro-descended peoples in Cuba and the United States came to identify themselves as part of a transcultural African diaspora.

Latinos

Author: Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520258273
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Latinos brings together the most sophisticated thinking on the changing intellectual complexion of America."--Henry Louis Gates, Jr., author of Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Black Man

Chicana Lives and Criminal Justice

Author: Juanita Díaz-Cotto
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477305963
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This first comprehensive study of Chicanas encountering the U.S. criminal justice system is set within the context of the international war on drugs as witnessed at street level in Chicana/o barrios. Chicana Lives and Criminal Justice uses oral history to chronicle the lives of twenty-four Chicana pintas (prisoners/former prisoners) repeatedly arrested and incarcerated for non-violent, low-level economic and drug-related crimes. It also provides the first documentation of the thirty-four-year history of Sybil Brand Institute, Los Angeles' former women's jail. In a time and place where drug war policies target people of color and their communities, drug-addicted Chicanas are caught up in an endless cycle of police abuse, arrest, and incarceration. They feel the impact of mandatory sentencing laws, failing social services and endemic poverty, violence, racism, and gender discrimination. The women in this book frankly discuss not only their jail experiences, but also their family histories, involvement with gangs, addiction to drugs, encounters with the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems, and their successful and unsuccessful attempts to recover from addiction and reconstitute fractured families. The Chicanas' stories underscore the amazing resilience and determination that have allowed many of the women to break the cycle of abuse. Díaz-Cotto also makes policy recommendations for those who come in contact with Chicanas/Latinas caught in the criminal justice system.

Latino Politics

Author: Lisa Garcia Bedolla
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745686427
Format: PDF
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Fully revised and updated, the second edition of this popular text provides students with a comprehensive introduction to Latino participation in US politics. Focusing on six Latino groups - Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, Salvadorans, and Guatemalans - the book explores the migration history of each group and shows how that experience has been affected by US foreign policy and economic interests in each country of origin. The political status of Latinos on arrival in the United States, including their civil rights, employment opportunities, and political incorporation, is then examined. Finally, the analysis follows each group’s history of collective mobilization and political activity, drawing out the varied ways they have engaged in the US political system. Using the tension between individual agency and structural constraints as its central organizing theme, the discussion situates Latino migrants, and their children, within larger macro economic and geo-political structures that influence their decisions to migrate and their ability to adapt socially, economically, and politically to their new country. It also demonstrates how Latinos continually have shown that through political action they can significantly improve their channels of opportunity. Thus, the book encourages students to think critically about what it means to be a racialized minority group within a majoritarian US political system, and how that position structures Latinos’ ability to achieve their social, economic, and political goals.

Unequal Freedom

Author: Evelyn Nakano GLENN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674037649
Format: PDF
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The inequalities that persist in America have deep historical roots. Evelyn Nakano Glenn untangles this complex history in a unique comparative regional study from the end of Reconstruction to the eve of World War II. During this era the country experienced enormous social and economic changes with the abolition of slavery, rapid territorial expansion, and massive immigration, and struggled over the meaning of free labor and the essence of citizenship as people who previously had been excluded sought the promise of economic freedom and full political rights. After a lucid overview of the concepts of the free worker and the independent citizen at the national level, Glenn vividly details how race and gender issues framed the struggle over labor and citizenship rights at the local level between blacks and whites in the South, Mexicans and Anglos in the Southwest, and Asians and haoles (the white planter class) in Hawaii. She illuminates the complex interplay of local and national forces in American society and provides a dynamic view of how labor and citizenship were defined, enforced, and contested in a formative era for white-nonwhite relations in America.