African Americans in Rutherford County

Author: Devora E. Butler
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439622388
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download and Read
African Americans have heavily contributed to and shaped the unique and vibrant Rutherford County in middle Tennessee. Located 30 miles southeast of Nashville, Rutherford County is at the state's geographical center. This area is home to the Stones River National Battlefield, a national park that was the site of a major Civil War battle--the Battle of Stones River. Tourists come from all over the world to experience this rich cultural and historic venue that once served, although briefly, as the capital of Tennessee. African American men and women have lived, worked, and toiled here for generations.

African Americans of Davidson County

Author: Tonya A. Lanier
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439626391
Format: PDF
Download and Read
African Americans were present in Davidson County long before it was officially formed from Rowan County in 1822. The exact time or place of settlement remains in question. They served not only in the stereotypical roles of farm laborers and house slaves but also as skilled traders, blacksmiths, furniture makers, and artisans. From Petersville, Southmont, Thomasville, Midway, Lexington, Belltown, Reeds, Churchland, and tiny areas in between, great men and women found a sense of stability. They made a life out of the scraps that were left behind. This collection of historical photographs is a textured look at African Americans in Davidson County. Images of community notables like A. B. Bingham, Charles England, Rev. A. T. Evans, and Etta Michael White and iconic structures like St. Stephen United Methodist Church, Dunbar High School, and the Hut, these photographs weave together stories that outline the African American journey.

African Americans of Henrico County

Author: Brenda Dabney Nichols
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738566504
Format: PDF, Docs
Download and Read
Henrico County, chartered in 1634, is one of the oldest counties in the state. Communities in Henrico created by African Americans are among the oldest continuing communities in America, as all of these communities were settled by 1863. The beauty of the settlements lay in the tenacity, determination, and resolve of pioneers who emerged from enslavement to create their own ideas of freedom. Rights to home and property ownership, businesses, churches, agencies, and schools defined the very essence of community. Despite efforts to halt their progress, African Americans independently sustained these communities. In Images of America: African Americans of Henrico County, nine communities are highlighted to demonstrate the indefatigable and indomitable spirit that continues to exist in these sacred places.

African Americans of Alexandria Virginia

Author: Char McCargo Bah
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625840918
Format: PDF
Download and Read
Sitting just south of the nation's capital, Alexandria has a long and storied history." "Still, little is known of Alexandria's twentieth-century African American community. Experience the harrowing narratives of trials and triumph as Alexandria's African Americans helped to shape not only their hometown but also the world around them. Rutherford Adkins became one of the first black fighter pilots as a Tuskegee Airman. Samuel Tucker, a twenty-six-year-old lawyer, organized and fought for Alexandria to share its wealth of knowledge with the African American community by opening its libraries to all colors and creeds. Discover a vibrant past that, through this record, will be remembered forever as Alexandria's beacon of hope and light.

Chowan Beach

Author: E. Frank Stephenson
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 9781596291645
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download and Read
In this nostalgic new book, author Frank Stephenson brings back the glory days of Chowan Beach with an array of vintage photographs and a brief history of the area. Come along as Stephenson revisits the past of this beloved beach and offers a reminder of what it meant to generations of African American visitors.

Murfreesboro in the Civil War

Author: Michael R. Bradley
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614234744
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download and Read
As the Civil War unfolded, Murfreesboro became hotly contested by Confederate and Union forces. Both sides occupied the town for significant periods, with power changing hands as the fighting raged. Punctuated by events like Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid on Union forces in July 1862, Jefferson Davis's visit and the wedding of General John Hunt Morgan and Martha Ready, wartime Murfreesboro saw no shortage of drama. As combat escalated, the bloody Battle of Stones River and the Nashville Campaign brought more destruction. Yet at war's end, the resilient locals remained and rebuilt their town from the rubble. Authors and Civil War historians Michael Bradley and Shirley Farris Jones track the tumult of the proceedings to recount the compelling story of Murfreesboro during the Civil War.

Forever Free

Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307834581
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download and Read
From one of our most distinguished historians, a new examination of the vitally important years of Emancipation and Reconstruction during and immediately following the Civil War–a necessary reconsideration that emphasizes the era’s political and cultural meaning for today’s America. In Forever Free, Eric Foner overturns numerous assumptions growing out of the traditional understanding of the period, which is based almost exclusively on white sources and shaped by (often unconscious) racism. He presents the period as a time of determination, especially on the part of recently emancipated black Americans, to put into effect the principles of equal rights and citizenship for all. Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, he places a new emphasis on the centrality of the black experience to an understanding of the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in helping win the Civil War, and–even more actively–in shaping Reconstruction and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. Foner makes clear how, by war’s end, freed slaves in the South built on networks of church and family in order to exercise their right of suffrage as well as gain access to education, land, and employment. He shows us that the birth of the Ku Klux Klan and renewed acts of racial violence were retaliation for the progress made by blacks soon after the war. He refutes lingering misconceptions about Reconstruction, including the attribution of its ills to corrupt African American politicians and “carpetbaggers,” and connects it to the movements for civil rights and racial justice. Joshua Brown’s illustrated commentary on the era’s graphic art and photographs complements the narrative. He offers a unique portrait of how Americans envisioned their world and time. Forever Free is an essential contribution to our understanding of the events that fundamentally reshaped American life after the Civil War–a persuasive reading of history that transforms our sense of the era from a time of failure and despair to a threshold of hope and achievement.

The African American History of Nashville Tennessee 1780 1930

Author: Bobby L. Lovett
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 155728556X
Format: PDF, ePub
Download and Read
Since its founding, Nashville has been a center of black urban culture in the Upper South. Blacks--slave and free--made up 20 percent of Fort Nashborough's settlers in 1779. From these early years through the Civil War, a growing black community in Nashville, led by a small group of black elites, quietly built the foundations of a future society, developing schools, churches, and businesses. The Civil War brought new freedoms and challenges as the black population of Nashville increased and as black elites found themselves able--even obliged--to act more openly. To establish a more stable and prosperous African-American community, the elites found that they had to work within a system bound to the interests of whites. But the aims of this elite did not always coincide with those of the black community at large. By 1930, younger blacks, in particular, were moving towards protest and confrontation. As democratization and higher education spread, the lines distinguishing Nashville's black elite became blurred. Bobby L. Lovett presents a complex analysis of black experience in Nashville during the years between 1780 and 1930, exploring the impact of civil rights, education, politics, religion, business, and neighborhood development on a particular African-American community. This study of black Nashville examines lives lived within a web of shifting alliances and interests--the choices made, the difficulties overcome. Fifteen years in the making, illustrated with maps and photographs, this work is the first detailed study of any of Tennessee's major urban black communities. Lovett here collects, organizes, and interprets a large, rich body of data, making this material newly accessible to all interested in the black urban experience.

The Forest City Lynching of 1900

Author: J. Timothy Cole
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786480401
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download and Read
Politics in Rutherford County were heated a century ago: the developing textile industry, the growing population, an agricultural crisis and race relations inflamed everyone. Mills Higgins Flack, a leader of the Farmers' Alliance and the county's first Populist in the state House, was allegedly murdered on August 28, 1900, by Avery Mills, an African American. This book documents the murder and the lynching of Avery Mills. The author (Flack's great-great-grandson) considers the phenomena of racial lynching, the Populist movement in the county, the white supremacy movement of the state's Democratic party and the county's KKK activities.