Action Learning in Schools

Author: Peter Aubusson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136616969
Format: PDF, Docs
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Teaching is becoming increasingly complex in the 21st Century, creating a need for more sophisticated frameworks to support teachers’ professional learning. Action learning is one such framework and has been used for workplace learning in business settings for many years. It is now becoming increasingly popular in school and university settings, but it is often misunderstood. This book clarifies what action learning is, linking key concepts to illustrate that it is not merely a process, but a dynamic interaction between professional learning, communities, leadership and change. The book brings together more than a decade of the authors’ research in school-based action learning. Rich and diverse, the research draws on more than 100 case studies of action learning by teams of teachers in schools. The authors: provide practical advice on how to initiate and sustain action learning; explain the interaction between action learning, teacher development, professional learning, community building, leadership and change; and illustrate how action learning can link to classroom practice so closely that it becomes part of what teachers do, rather than an added impost. Addressing the highs and lows, the successes and failures, and their underlying causes, Action Learning in Schools provides insights into theories of cooperation, innovation, leadership and community formation to inform individual projects and large-scale school improvement initiatives. It will be of interest to teacher educators, pre-service and experienced teachers alike, as well as school and education system managers and policymakers keen to enhance teacher professional learning and educational outcomes for students.

Authentic Professional Learning

Author: Ann Webster-Wright
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048139477
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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There is considerable and growing interest in professionals learning across their working lives. The growth in this interest is likely premised upon the increasing percentage of those who are being employed under the designation as professi- als or para-professional workers in advanced industrial economies. Part of being designated in this way is a requirement to be able to work autonomously and in a relatively self-regulated manner. Of course, many other kinds of employment also demand such behaviours. However, there is particular attention being given to the ongoing development of workers who are seen to make crucial decisions and take actions about health, legal and ?nancial matters. Part of this attention derives from expectations within the community that those who are granted relative autonomy and are often paid handsomely should be current and informed in their decisi- making. Then, like all other workers, professionals are required to maintain their competence in the face of changing requirements for work. Consequently, a volume that seeks to inform how best this ongoing learning can be understood, supported and assisted is most timely and welcomed. This volume seeks to elaborate professional learning through a consideration of the concept of authentic professional learning. What is proposed here is that, in contrast to programmatic approaches towards professional development, the process of continuing professional learning is a personal, complex and diverse process that does not lend itself to easy prescription or the realisation of others’ intents.

Action Learning and its Applications

Author: R. Dilworth
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230250742
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This second volume of two discusses the employment of action learning in different contexts, including healthcare, education, government, military and the business world. Use of action learning in delivery of Future Search Conferences is addressed, as well as action learning in community and civil society and the future of action learning.

Reframing Science Teaching and Learning

Author: David Stroupe
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317272811
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Responding to recent reform efforts, such as the Next Generation Science Standards, which call for students to learn science practices, this book proposes a conceptual reframing of the roles of teachers and students in formal and informal science learning settings. Inviting the field to examine the state of "science practice," it provides concrete examples of how students, supported by the actions of educators, take on new roles, shifting from passive recipients of information to active participants in conceptual, social, epistemic, and material features of science work. Each chapter provides an examination of how and why science practice evolves in learning communities in which students and teachers negotiate disciplinary work; an analysis of how specific pedagogical and social actions taken by someone with authority (a teacher or other educator) provides opportunities for students to shape science practices; a set of concrete recommendations for working with young students in formal and informal learning settings; and a set of suggestions and questions to catalyze future research about and the evolving relationships between educators, students, and science practices in the field of science education. Showing how and why the conceptual ideas presented are important, and providing specific, actionable suggestions for teachers and other educators for their daily work, this book includes both elementary and secondary learning sites.

Complexity Thinking in Physical Education

Author: Tim Hopper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415507219
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This title focuses on complexity thinking in the context of physical education, enabling fresh ways of thinking about research, teaching, curriculum and learning. Written by a team of leading international physical education scholars, the book highlights how the considerable theoretical promise of complexity can be reflected in the actual policies, pedagogies and practices of physical education.

Reflective Practice for Educators

Author: Karen F. Osterman
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1632209845
Format: PDF
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Written for teachers, administrators, and professional development specialists in schools and universities, this book is an educators’ guide to reflective practice. In clear, accessible language, the authors explain the potential to create meaningful change in schools and show you how to integrate reflective practice effectively into the daily work of schools. The book: - Explains reflective practice as a professional development strategy and its importance for school reform - Offers ideas and practical strategies to facilitate collaborative, data-based inquiry, dialogue, and problem-solving in schools - Describes reflective practice in action and illustrates its power to create meaningful change in classrooms - Shows how reflective practice is an important step in creating professional learning organizations Reflective practice has the potential to renew your sense of optimism, commitment, and efficacy as you learn how to support meaningful professional growth, shape a culture of learning, and make important changes in students’ learning.

Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning

Author: Linda Adler-Kassner
Publisher: Utah State University Press
ISBN: 9780874217988
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Adler-Kassner and O'Neill show writing faculty and administrators how to frame discussions of writing assessment so that they accurately represent research-based practices, and promote assessments that are valid, reliable, and discipline-appropriate. Public discourse about writing instruction is currently driven by ideas of what instructors and programs “need to do,” “should do,” or “are not doing,” and is based on poorly informed concepts of correctness and unfounded claims about a broad decline in educational quality. This discussion needs to be reframed, say Adler-Kassner and O'Neill, to help policymakers understand that the purpose of writing instruction is to help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing strategies that will form the foundation for their future educations, professional careers, and civic engagement. Reframing Writing Assessment to Improve Teaching and Learning is grounded in the best of writing assessment research, and focuses on how to communicate it effectively to publics beyond academe.

Inside Teacher Education Challenging Prior Views of Teaching and Learning

Author: S.M. Bullock
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9460914039
Format: PDF
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Learning to teach is complex. Teacher candidates begin a preservice program with powerful tacit assumptions about how teachers teach based on lengthy apprenticeships of observation over many years as students. Virtually all teacher education programs provide a mixture of coursework and classroom experience. Much has been written about the theory-into-practice approach in teacher education, an approach that assumes teacher candidates who have been provided with instructions about how to teach will be able to recall and apply them in a school setting. In reality, teacher candidates report considerable difficulty enacting theory in practice, to the point that many question the value of coursework. This book takes an in-depth look at five future teachers in one teacher education program, analyzing and interpreting how they and their teacher educators learn from experience during both coursework and practicum experiences. Many assumptions about the complex challenges of teaching teachers are called into question. Is the role of a teacher educator to synthesize research-based best practices for candidates to take to their field placements? Does the preservice practicum experience challenge or reinforce a lifetime of socialized experiences in schools? Must methods courses always be seen by most teacher candidates as little more than sites for collecting resources? Where and how do candidates construct professional knowledge of teaching? The data illustrate clearly that methods courses can be sites for powerful learning that challenges tacit assumptions about how and why we teach.

Beyond Affirmative Action

Author: Robert A. Ibarra
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299169008
Format: PDF
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A century ago, universities were primarily in the business of molding upper-class young men for the professions. The world has changed, and universities have been forced to keep pace by experimenting with affirmative action, curriculum overhauls, part-time degree programs, and the like. But at the core of the modern university establishment is an ingrained academic culture that has operated in the same ways for centuries, contends Robert Ibarra, and in Beyond Affirmative Action, he calls for a complete paradigm shift. Why does academic culture, he asks, emphasize individual achievement over teamwork? Why do so many exams test discrete bits of knowledge rather than understanding of the big picture? Why is tenure awarded for scholarly publications rather than for sharing knowledge in diverse ways with students and a wider community? Why do undergraduates drop out? And why do so many bright graduate students and junior faculty—including many minorities, women, and some majority males—become disenchanted with academia or fail to be accepted and rewarded by the tenured faculty? Ibarra introduces a theory of "multicontextuality," which proposes that many people learn better when teachers emphasize whole systems of knowledge and that education can create its greatest successes by offering and accepting many approaches to teaching and learning. This revolutionary paradigm also addresses why current thinking about academic systems and organizational culture, affirmative action, and diversity must be revised. Ibarra bases his groundbreaking proposals upon his own synthesis of findings from anthropological, educational, and psychological studies of how people from various cultures learn, as well as findings from extended interviews he conducted with Latinos and Latinas who pursued graduate degrees and then either became university faculty or chose other careers. From his perspectives as a practicing anthropologist, teacher, researcher, and administrator, Ibarra provides a blueprint for change that will interest: o Administrators developing campus strategic plans o Boards, commissions, and agencies making policy for educational institutions o Students and faculty struggling to find ways that academia can serve multiple constituencies o Academic and career advisors to students o Researchers in cognitive psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, and ethnic studies o Businesses rethinking their organizational cultures and strategies