A History of American Literary Journalism

Author: John C. Hartsock
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558492523
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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During the 1960s, such works as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem were cited as examples of the "new journalism." True stories that read like novels, they combined the journalist's task of factual reporting with the art of fictional narration. Yet as John C. Hartsock shows in this revealing study, the roots of this distinctive form of writing--whether called new journalism, literary journalism, or creative nonfiction--can be traced at least as far back as the late nineteenth century. In the decades following the American Civil War, Stephen Crane, Lafcadio Hearn, and other journalists challenged the notion, then just emerging, that the reporter's job was to offer a concise statement of the "objective truth." Drawing on the techniques of the realistic novel, these writers developed a new narrative style of reporting aimed at lessening the distance between observer and observed, subject and object. By the 1890s, Hartsock argues, literary journalism had achieved critical recognition as a new form of writing, different not only from "objective" reporting but also from the sensationalistic "yellow press" and at times the socially engaged "muckrakers." In the twentieth century, the form has continued to evolve and maintain its vitality, despite being marginalized by the academic establishment. A former journalist who covered Capitol Hill for UPI and reported on the collapse of the Soviet Union for the San Francisco Examiner, Hartsock brings a fresh and informed perspective to the issues he examines. The result is a concise introduction to the genesis and development of a significant literary genre.

Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century

Author: Norman Sims
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810125196
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This wide-ranging collection of critical essays on literary journalism addresses the shifting border between fiction and non-fiction, literature and journalism. Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century addresses general and historical issues, explores questions of authorial intent and the status of the territory between literature and journalism, and offers a case study of Mary McCarthy’s 1953 piece, "Artists in Uniform," a classic of literary journalism. Sims offers a thought-provoking study of the nature of perception and the truth, as well as issues facing journalism today.

True Stories

Author: Norman Sims
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810124696
Format: PDF
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Journalism in the twentieth century was marked by the rise of literary journalism. Sims traces more than a century of its history, examining the cultural connections, competing journalistic schools of thought, and innovative writers that have given literary journalism its power. Seminal exmples of the genre provide ample context and background for the study of this style of journalism.

Literary Journalism and the Aesthetics of Experience

Author: John C. Hartsock
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781625341730
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Proponents and practitioners of narrative literary journalism have sought to assert its distinctiveness as both a literary form and a type of journalism. In Literary Journalism and the Aesthetics of Experience, John C. Hartsock argues that this often neglected kind of journalism--exemplified by such renowned works as John Hersey's Hiroshima, James Agee's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, and Joan Didion's Slouching Towards Bethlehem--has emerged as an important genre of its own, not just a hybrid of the techniques of fiction and the conventions of traditional journalism. Hartsock situates narrative literary journalism within the broader histories of the American tradition of "objective" journalism and the standard novel. While all embrace the value of narrative, or storytelling, literary journalism offers a particular "aesthetics of experience" lacking in both the others. Not only does literary journalism disrupt the myths sustained by conventional journalism and the novel, but its rich details and attention to everyday life question readers' cultural assumptions. Drawing on the critical theories of Nietzsche, Bakhtin, Benjamin, and others, Hartsock argues that the aesthetics of experience challenge the shibboleths that often obscure the realities the other two forms seek to convey. At a time when print media appear in decline, Hartsock offers a thoughtful response to those who ask, "What place if any is there for a narrative literary journalism in a rapidly changing media world?"

A Sourcebook of American Literary Journalism

Author: Thomas Bernard Connery
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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"...This book promises to be a useful reference source and would be a welcome addition to public and high school libraries....The book's focus makes it unique..." Booklist

The Art of Fact

Author: Kevin Kerrane
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780684846309
Format: PDF, Docs
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Historical and international in scope, a unique anthology traces the course of literary journalism and nonfiction prose from its origins in the eighteenth century to today, from Daniel Defoe to Joseph Mitchell to Richard Ben Cramer. 15,000 first printing.

Literary Journalism Across the Globe

Author: John S. Bak
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 155849877X
Format: PDF
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At the end of the nineteenth century, several countries were developing journalistic traditions similar to what we identify today as literary reportage or literary journalism. Yet throughout most of the twentieth century, in particular after World War I, that tradition was overshadowed and even marginalized by the general perception among democratic states that journalism ought to be either "objective," as in the American tradition, or "polemical," as in the European. Nonetheless, literary journalism would survive and, at times, even thrive. How and why is a story that is unique to each nation. Though largely considered an Anglo-American phenomenon today, literary journalism has had a long and complex international history, one built on a combination of traditions and influences that are sometimes quite specific to a nation and at other times come from the blending of cultures across borders. These essays examine this phenomenon from various international perspectives, documenting literary journalism's rich and diverse heritage and describing its development within a global context. In addition to the editors, contributors include David Abrahamson, Peiqin Chen, Clazina Dingemanse, William Dow, Rutger de Graaf, John Hartsock, Nikki Hessell, Maria Lassila-Merisalo, Edvaldo Pereira Lima, Willa McDonald, Jenny McKay, Sonja Merljak Zdovc, Sonia Parratt, Norman Sims, Isabel Soares,and Soenke Zehle.

Literary Journalism

Author: Edd Applegate
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313299490
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Overviews literary journalism and provides biographical entries for writers and editors who practiced literary journalism.

Literary Journalism on Trial

Author: Kathy Roberts Forde
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558496538
Format: PDF, ePub
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In November 1984, Jeffrey Masson filed a libel suit against writer Janet Malcolm and the New Yorker, claiming that Malcolm had intentionally misquoted him in a profile she wrote for the magazine. This text explores the implications of Masson v. New Yorker in the context of the history of American journalism.