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American Black History (ENHANCED eBook)

American Black History (ENHANCED eBook)
Author: Walter Hazen
Publisher: Lorenz Educational Press
ISBN: 1429109912
Pages: 100
Year: 2004-09-01
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"American Black History" is a concise yet thorough treatment of 500 years of African American history from its origins in the civilizations of Africa through the grim early years in America and the quest for freedom and civil rights. Richly illustrated, the book vividly details the rise of slavery, the abolitionist movement, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the role of blacks in the nation's wars, the Harlem Renaissance, the emergence of the civil rights era, and the arduous struggle for the full claims of citizenship. Lively portraits of key cultural and political figures such as Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and countless others make clear the enormous contributions of blacks in America. Tests, answer key, and bibliography are included.

A Kid's Guide to African American History

A Kid's Guide to African American History
Author: Nancy Sanders
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1613740360
Pages: 256
Year: 2007-06-01
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What do all these people have in common: the first man to die in the American Revolution, a onetime chief of the Crow Nation, the inventors of peanut butter and the portable X-ray machine, and the first person to make a wooden clock in this country? They were all great African Americans. For parents and teachers interested in fostering cultural awareness among children of all races, this book includes more than 70 hands-on activities, songs, and games that teach kids about the people, experiences, and events that shaped African American history. This expanded edition contains new material throughout, including additional information and biographies. Children will have fun designing an African mask, making a medallion like those worn by early abolitionists, playing the rhyming game "Juba," inventing Brer Rabbit riddles, and creating a unity cup for Kwanzaa. Along the way they will learn about inspiring African American artists, inventors, and heroes like Harriet Tubman, Benjamin Banneker, Rosa Parks, Langston Hughes, and Louis Armstrong, to name a few.

The Black History of the White House

The Black History of the White House
Author: Clarence Lusane
Publisher: City Lights Books
ISBN: 0872866114
Pages: 544
Year: 2013-01-23
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The Black History of the White House presents the untold history, racial politics, and shifting significance of the White House as experienced by African Americans, from the generations of enslaved people who helped to build it or were forced to work there to its first black First Family, the Obamas. Clarence Lusane juxtaposes significant events in White House history with the ongoing struggle for democratic, civil, and human rights by black Americans and demonstrates that only during crises have presidents used their authority to advance racial justice. He describes how in 1901 the building was officially named the “White House” amidst a furious backlash against President Roosevelt for inviting Booker T. Washington to dinner, and how that same year that saw the consolidation of white power with the departure of the last black Congressmember elected after the Civil War. Lusane explores how, from its construction in 1792 to its becoming the home of the first black president, the White House has been a prism through which to view the progress and struggles of black Americans seeking full citizenship and justice. “Clarence Lusane is one of America’s most thoughtful and critical thinkers on issues of race, class and power.”—Manning Marable "Barack Obama may be the first black president in the White House, but he's far from the first black person to work in it. In this fascinating history of all the enslaved people, workers and entertainers who spent time in the president's official residence over the years, Clarence Lusane restores the White House to its true colors."—Barbara Ehrenreich "Reading The Black History of the White House shows us how much we DON'T know about our history, politics, and culture. In a very accessible and polished style, Clarence Lusane takes us inside the key national events of the American past and present. He reveals new dimensions of the black presence in the US from revolutionary days to the Obama campaign. Yes, 'black hands built the White House'—enslaved black hands—but they also built this country's economy, political system, and culture, in ways Lusane shows us in great detail. A particularly important feature of this book its personal storytelling: we see black political history through the experiences and insights of little-known participants in great American events. The detailed lives of Washington's slaves seeking freedom, or the complexities of Duke Ellington's relationships with the Truman and Eisenhower White House, show us American racism, and also black America's fierce hunger for freedom, in brand new and very exciting ways. This book would be a great addition to many courses in history, sociology, or ethnic studies courses. Highly recommended!"—Howard Winant "The White House was built with slave labor and at least six US presidents owned slaves during their time in office. With these facts, Clarence Lusane, a political science professor at American University, opens The Black History of the White House(City Lights), a fascinating story of race relations that plays out both on the domestic front and the international stage. As Lusane writes, 'The Lincoln White House resolved the issue of slavery, but not that of racism.' Along with the political calculations surrounding who gets invited to the White House are matters of musical tastes and opinionated first ladies, ingredients that make for good storytelling."—Boston Globe Dr. Clarence Lusane has published in The Washington Post, The Miami Herald, The Baltimore Sun, Oakland Tribune, Black Scholar, and Race and Class. He often appears on PBS, BET, C-SPAN, and other national media.

Freedom's Teacher (Large Print 16pt)

Freedom's Teacher (Large Print 16pt)
Author: Katherine Mellon Charron
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458782301
Pages: 464
Year: 2011-06-01
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Septima Poinsette Clark's gift to the civil rights movement was education. In the mid-1950s, this former public school teacher developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. This vibrantly written biography places Clark (1898-1987) in a long tradition of southern African American activist educators, women who spent their lives teaching citizenship by helping people to help themselves. Freedom's Teacher traces Clark's life from her earliest years as a student, teacher, and community member in rural and urban South Carolina to her increasing radicalization as an activist following World War II, highlighting how Clark brought her life's work to bear on the civil rights movement. Katherine Mellen Charron's engaging portrait demonstrates Clark's crucial role--and the role of many black women teachers--in making education a cornerstone of the twentieth-century freedom struggle. Drawing on autobiographies and memoirs by fellow black educators, state educational records, papers from civil rights organizations, and oral histories, Charron argues that the schoolhouse served as an important institutional base for the movement. Clark's program also fostered participation from grassroots southern black women, affording them the opportunity to link their personal concerns to their political involvement on the community's behalf. Using Clark's life as a lens, Charron sheds valuable new light on southern black women's activism in national, state, and judicial politics, from the Progressive Era to the civil rights movement and beyond.

Handy African American History Answer Book

Handy African American History Answer Book
Author: Jessie Carney Smith
Publisher: Visible Ink Press
ISBN: 157859488X
Pages: 432
Year: 2014-01-01
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Walking readers through a rich but often overlooked part of American history, this compendium addresses the people, times, and events that influenced and changed African American history. An overview of major biographical figures and history-making events is followed by a deeper look at the development in the arts, entertainment, business, civil rights, music, government, journalism, religion, science, sports, and more. Mimicking the a broad range of the African American experience, showcasing interesting insights and facts, this helpful reference answers a wide variety of questions including What is the significance of the Apollo Theater? What were the effects of the Great Depression on black artists? Who were some of America’s early free black entrepreneurs? What is the historical role of the barbershop in the African American community? and What was Black Wall Street? Blending trivia with historical review in an engaging question-and-answer format, this book is perfect for browsing and is ideal for history buffs, trivia fans, students and teachers and anyone interested in a better and more thorough understanding of history of black Americans.

Hidden History: Profiles of Black Americans (ENHANCED eBook)

Hidden History: Profiles of Black Americans (ENHANCED eBook)
Author: Walter Hazen
Publisher: Lorenz Educational Press
ISBN: 1429110139
Pages: 56
Year: 2004-09-01
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Ever wonder who spied for the Union army during the Civil War; who planted the American flag on the North Pole; who was the first female stunt pilot; and who invented refrigerated trucks and railroad cars? These questions and more are answered in "Hidden History: Profiles of Black Americans." Recognizing that there is more to black history than civil rights leaders and the fight for racial equality, this book profiles 25 lesser known yet significant personalities and events from colonial times to the present. Reading comprehension questions as well as writing activities to promote higher order thinking accompany each profile. A reproducible trivia card game, perfect for learning center or classroom, reinforces the content and makes learning fun!

Through the Storm, Through the Night

Through the Storm, Through the Night
Author: Paul Harvey
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742564738
Pages: 217
Year: 2011
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Paul Harvey illustrates how black Christian traditions provided theological, institutional, and personal strategies for cultural survival during bondage and into an era of partial freedom. At the same time, he covers the ongoing tug-of-war between themes of "respectability" versus practices derived from an African heritage; the adoption of Christianity by the majority; and the critique of the adoption of the "white man's religion" from the eighteenth century to the present. The book also covers internal cultural, gendered, and class divisions in churches that attracted congregants of widely disparate educational levels, incomes, and worship styles. Through the Storm, Through the Night provides a lively overview of the history of African American religion, beginning with the birth of African Christianity amidst the Transatlantic slave trade, and tracing the story through its growth in America. Paul Harvey successfully uses the history of African American religion to portray the complexity and humanity of the African American experience.

Defining Moments in Black History

Defining Moments in Black History
Author: Dick Gregory
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062898930
Pages: 272
Year: 2018-09-18
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NAACP 2017 Image Award Winner With his trademark acerbic wit, incisive humor, and infectious paranoia, one of our foremost comedians and most politically engaged civil rights activists looks back at 100 key events from the complicated history of black America. A friend of luminaries including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Medgar Evers, and the forebear of today’s popular black comics, including Larry Wilmore, W. Kamau Bell, Damon Young, and Trevor Noah, Dick Gregory was a provocative and incisive cultural force for more than fifty years. As an entertainer, he always kept it indisputably real about race issues in America, fearlessly lacing laughter with hard truths. As a leading activist against injustice, he marched at Selma during the Civil Rights movement, organized student rallies to protest the Vietnam War; sat in at rallies for Native American and feminist rights; fought apartheid in South Africa; and participated in hunger strikes in support of Black Lives Matter. In this collection of thoughtful, provocative essays, Gregory charts the complex and often obscured history of the African American experience. In his unapologetically candid voice, he moves from African ancestry and surviving the Middle Passage to the creation of the Jheri Curl, the enjoyment of bacon and everything pig, the headline-making shootings of black men, and the Black Lives Matter movement. A captivating journey through time, Defining Moments in Black History explores historical movements such as The Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as cultural touchstones such as Sidney Poitier winning the Best Actor Oscar for Lilies in the Field and Billie Holiday releasing Strange Fruit. An engaging look at black life that offers insightful commentary on the intricate history of the African American people, Defining Moments in Black History is an essential, no-holds-bar history lesson that will provoke, enlighten, and entertain.

America's Black Founders

America's Black Founders
Author: Nancy I. Sanders
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1556528116
Pages: 150
Year: 2010-01-01
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Celebrates the lesser-known lives and contributions of early African-American men and women, in a volume that features such complementary activities as recipes for colonial foods and advice for petitioning the government. Original.

Remembering the Past in Contemporary African American Fiction

Remembering the Past in Contemporary African American Fiction
Author: Keith Byerman
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080787678X
Pages: 240
Year: 2006-05-18
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With close readings of more than twenty novels by writers including Ernest Gaines, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Gloria Naylor, and John Edgar Wideman, Keith Byerman examines the trend among African American novelists of the late twentieth century to write about black history rather than about their own present. Employing cultural criticism and trauma theory, Byerman frames these works as survivor narratives that rewrite the grand American narrative of individual achievement and the march of democracy. The choice to write historical narratives, he says, must be understood historically. These writers earned widespread recognition for their writing in the 1980s, a period of African American commercial success, as well as the economic decline of the black working class and an increase in black-on-black crime. Byerman contends that a shared experience of suffering joins African American individuals in a group identity, and writing about the past serves as an act of resistance against essentialist ideas of black experience shaping the cultural discourse of the present. Byerman demonstrates that these novels disrupt the temptation in American society to engage history only to limit its significance or to crown successful individuals while forgetting the victims.

Desegregating the Dollar

Desegregating the Dollar
Author: Robert E. Weems
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814792901
Pages: 195
Year: 1998-02-01
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"Basing his conclusions on exhaustive research in trade journals and other primary and secondary materials, Robert E. Weems Jr. has given us the definitive account of the complicated relationship between African Americans, capitalism, and consumerism."--BOOK JACKET.

African American History

African American History
Author: Joanne Turner-Sadler
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 1433107430
Pages: 265
Year: 2009
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Every year more colleges and high schools are offering classes (and often making them required classes) in black history. Joanne Turner-Sadler provides a concise and probing treatment of 400 years of black history in America that can be used with age groups ranging from lower high school to college. In African American History: An Introduction the author touches on key figures and events that have shaped African American culture beginning with a look at Africa and its various civilizations and the migration of the African people to America. Some essential topics covered are: the struggle with slavery, the role African Americans played in America’s wars (including the current war in Iraq), race riots and unions, the NAACP, civil rights, and black power movements, the Harlem Renaissance, issues in education, the journey into the West, legal cases such as Plessy vs. Ferguson and Brown vs. Board of Education, African Americans as athletes, entertainers, and statesmen. This book is an indispensable addition to all library collections as well as a teaching tool for instructors. It is heavily illustrated (photos, maps, timelines) with useful end-of-the-chapter questions and activities for further study and includes a handy bibliography of suggested readings and an index. New in this edition is a section on the historic election of Barack Obama, the first African American president of the United States. Interesting connections Obama has to past presidents are explored as well. This edition also contains enhanced discussions of Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice, and the historic positions both held.

The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers

The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers
Author: Various
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143130676
Pages: 656
Year: 2017-07-25
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A landmark collection documenting the social, political, and artistic lives of African American women throughout the tumultuous nineteenth century. Named one of NPR's Best Books of 2017. The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers is the most comprehensive anthology of its kind: an extraordinary range of voices offering the expressions of African American women in print before, during, and after the Civil War. Edited by Hollis Robbins and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., this collection comprises work from forty-nine writers arranged into sections of memoir, poetry, and essays on feminism, education, and the legacy of African American women writers. Many of these pieces engage with social movements like abolition, women’s suffrage, temperance, and civil rights, but the thematic center is the intellect and personal ambition of African American women. The diverse selection includes well-known writers like Sojourner Truth, Hannah Crafts, and Harriet Jacobs, as well as lesser-known writers like Ella Sheppard, who offers a firsthand account of life in the world-famous Fisk Jubilee Singers. Taken together, these incredible works insist that the writing of African American women writers be read, remembered, and addressed. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

An African American and Latinx History of the United States

An African American and Latinx History of the United States
Author: Paul Ortiz
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807013102
Pages: 276
Year: 2018
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"Spanning more than two hundred years, An African American and Latinx History of the United States is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the "Global South" was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy, " and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism. Drawing on rich narratives and primary source documents, Ortiz links racial segregation in the Southwest and the rise and violent fall of a powerful tradition of Mexican labor organizing in the twentieth century, to May 1, 2006, known as International Workers' Day, when migrant laborers--Chicana/os, Afrocubanos, and immigrants from every continent on earth--united in resistance on the first "Day Without Immigrants." As African American civil rights activists fought against Jim Crow laws and Mexican labor organizers warred against the suffocating grip of capitalism, Black and Spanish-language newspapers, abolitionists, and Latin American revolutionaries coalesced around movements built between people from the United States and people from Central America and the Caribbean. And in stark contrast to the resurgence of "America first" rhetoric, Black and Latinx intellectuals and organizers today have urged the United States to build bridges of solidarity with the nations of the America. Incisive and timely, this bottom-up history, told from the interconnected vantage points of Latinx and African Americas, reveals the radically different ways that people of the diaspora have addressed issues still plaguing the United States today, and it offers a way forward in the continued struggle for universal civil rights."--Dust jacket.

Strangers in the Land of Paradise

Strangers in the Land of Paradise
Author: Lillian Serece Williams
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253214084
Pages: 273
Year: 2000
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Now in paperback! Strangers in the Land of Paradise The Creation of an African American Community, Buffalo, NY, 1900–1940 Lillian Serece Williams Examines the settlement of African Americans in Buffalo during the Great Migration. "A splendid contribution to the fields of African-American and American urban, social and family history.... expanding the tradition that is now well underway of refuting the pathological emphasis of the prevailing ghetto studies of the 1960s and '70s." —Joe W. Trotter Strangers in the Land of Paradise discusses the creation of an African American community as a distinct cultural entity. It describes values and institutions that Black migrants from the South brought with them, as well as those that evolved as a result of their interaction with Blacks native to the city and the city itself. Through an examination of work, family, community organizations, and political actions, Lillian Williams explores the process by which the migrants adapted to their new environment. The lives of African Americans in Buffalo from 1900 to 1940 reveal much about race, class, and gender in the development of urban communities. Black migrant workers transformed the landscape by their mere presence, but for the most part they could not rise beyond the lowest entry-level positions. For African American women, the occupational structure was even more restricted; eventually, however, both men and women increased their earning power, and that—over time—improved life for both them and their loved ones. Lillian Serece Williams is Associate Professor of History in the Women's Studies Department and Director of the Institute for Research on Women at Albany, the State University of New York. She is editor of Records of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs, 1895–1992, associate editor of Black Women in United States History, and author of A Bridge to the Future: The History of Diversity in Girl Scouting. 352 pages, 14 b&w illus., 15 maps, notes, bibl., index, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 Blacks in the Diaspora—Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey, Jr., and David Barry Gaspar, general editors

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